19 Apr 2014

Nomawkish flavoured journey back in time : Diamond Gloss

Gonçalo Pereira (born 1984. Lisbon, Portugal) is a multi-instrument player, post-rock and ambient electronica musician, producer. Pereira first started as a frontman of the post-rock band “How Comes The Constellations Shine” before establishing himself as a solo artist under the moniker of Diamond Gloss.

His influences travels among modern composers such as Arvo Pärt and Henryk Górecki, the ambient experiments of Brian Eno or his peers Autechre, Hammock, Sigur Rós, Helios and Múm. Composing music, he relies on help of pianos, microbeats, effectstreated guitars and musicboxes. His sound and melodies incorporate elements of modern classical, electronica, idm, ambient, and postrock music with live instrumentation. Listeners of ambient and modern classical artists like Jónsi and Alex, Hammock, Olafur Arnalds, Sigur Rós, Múm, Nils Frahm may find the atmosphere they are looking for.

Nomawkish is the second studio album from Portuguese ambient / modern classical project Diamond Gloss. Three years after debuting with “Bears”, Gonçalo Pereira returned to his studio to record new Diamond Gloss songs. The whole album was recorded in Lisbon and like on the first album, piano is the key instrument also on this recording. “Bears” and “Nomawkish” also differ in their moods, the former was more joyful and open, whereas the latter is more dark and introspective.

The recording of this album started with various loops recorded after “Bears” was released. The album was recorded entirely with piano and then layered with strings, dulcitone, choirs and ambient noises. Nomawkish offers a lo-fi feeling, almost like an old tape playing back on a walkman. This lo-fi production was an intentional choice for this album. Compared to Diamond Gloss’ previous work, this album is a logical step forward.

Listen, buy or download this album

03 Jun 2012

An interview with Gargle and Yawning’s Jun Minowa

We are running a couple of interview series starting with the ones where Fluttery Records artists interviews each other. We have asked Jan Hammer of Draff Krimmy to interview Jun Minowa of the post-rock band Gargle who also has his modern classical / ambient project, Yawning. Here is the interview between Norway and Japan. Enjoy!

Jan Hammer: How are you? How is Japan today? We haven`t forgot what happened last year in Fukushima.

Jun Minowa: Hi, Jan. I’m all right, thank you. I hope you’re all well, too. Last year, there were many shocking catastrophic disasters and incidents across the world and the news about the Norway terrorism was so shocking to me. As for Japan, we’ve generally returned to our normal lives, but on the other hand it’s still hard to tell if what they’ve told us about Fukushima is true or not. On the day it happened, some people from overseas were concerned about us and sent me messages. I have no words to express how encouraging to me their words were. I’ll never forget about them.

Jan Hammer: Fluttery Records released your new album GLOW IN THE GLOOM. What are your musical influences? It`s not so easy not to mention Mono or Envy, isn`t it? The song MEDITATION reminds me of the album PALMLESS PRAYER / MASS MURDER REFRAIN by MONO & WORLD`S END GIRLFRIEND (like I think, the best Mono album).

Jun Minowa: Yeah, I’m a big fan of them. I think I’m influenced by them in many ways – not only their music but attitude. It’s interesting and also my pleasure to hear you mentioned PALMLESS PRAYER / MASS MURDER REFRAIN. It’s a really beautiful album and a good collaboration as a whole. Like many people, I’ve listened to various kind of music. Nirvana, My Bloody Valentine and some other rock bands have still made big influences on me. It was also fun to discover some other related independent bands to them. It was a state like a school kid is looking for a comfort zone in a class. After a while, I wanted to be away from typical format of rock/pop music. It’s because I’d become to feel they were not my music. It was a state of leaving behind, or living in a shell. In those days I could encounter some good independent music. Godspeed You! Black Emperor was one of them. When I saw Mono’s show first, it may be an exaggeration but I felt they changed my life. And then I loved to listen to some stuff of Temporary Residence Limited. I though their music were honest, pure and beautiful. Notably Eluvium made big influence on me. At the same time, it was natural for me to start discovering some classical and contemporary music like Arvo Part, J. S. Bach, Ludwig van Beethoven, and also some modern classical stuff like Sylvain Chauveau.

Now I guess I only like music that appeals to me emotionally. I think I’m not so interested in music if it doesn’t appeal to me deeply even though it is technically competent or theoretically excellent.

Gargle is a duo from Japan whose music is commonly categorized as ambient, post-rock, experimental and modern classical music.

Jan Hammer:  What music do you like to listen to? What was the last album you bought?

Jun Minowa: The very last album I bought was a compilation album of Samuel Barber’s works which includes “Adagio for Strings, Op.11a” performed by London Philharmonic Orchestra & David Parry. I liked this recording. And also I bought an Arvo Part’s album “I Am the True Vine”. Also what I listen to often recently are Bosques de mi Mente’s new album “20 de Abril” and “Static Nocturne” by Eluvium.

Jan Hammer:  How and when did you start making music?

Jun Minowa: I remember I at first started trying to write rock tunes with my guitar that were deteriorated version of Nirvana, Radiohead or The Smiths that required vocals. And then, about 8 years ago (?), I started writing simple instrumental pieces. Gradually, I started writing songs with a keyboard (piano) with my headphone. It’s just because I cannot play guitar at night in my apartment even though I don’t use a guitar amp, but eventually it made my composition develop. Recently I wrote both Gargle and Yawning’s songs only on keyboards and then I arrange guitar and some other parts.

Draff Krimmy is an international music project which brings many artists from all over the world together

Jan Hammer: What does inspire you – people, places, weather, seasons …?

Jun Minowa: Probably people. It might be an interaction, a miscommunication, an isolation or a misunderstanding, anyhow people inspire my feelings most. Of course places and seasons inspire me too but some of such feelings dwell after all.

Jan Hammer: What does the bandname Gargle means to you?

Jun Minowa: It doesn’t mean anything. Seriously, I am very bad at putting names to my bands. Song titles neither. I just wanted a mononymous name. I didn’t even realize that my both projects’ names are about around mouth movements before I was pointed out by a friend of mine.

Jan Hammer: Did you always want to be an instrumental band? If yes, why?

Jun Minowa: Yes. At least for now. Many of my favorite bands have vocalists but I don’t think I would want to do that in my projects. Because I think it’s really difficult to disconnect from vocalist’s ego and work out music as a whole, and yet I don’t know how. But in the future, I’m a little interested in collaborating with a vocalist or a choir.

Jan Hammer: What does the album means to you?

Jun Minowa: Honestly I am happy that GLOW IN THE GLOOM has been released. At the same time, since some of the songs were recorded a little while ago, I feel a bit that it is a kind of introduction. It may sound strange but the feeling is like when our next album is out, it makes sense totally.

Jan Hammer: Did your songs tell a story? Are they about anything

Jun Minowa: While there are specific themes on some of my songs, most of my songs don’t have specific stories but more fuzzy theme as a whole like searching a light in the dark or such. When I write a song, it usually comes out with a piece of melodies and emotion, and then forming into a song with mixed emotions eventually.

Jan Hammer: How was the feedback? I really like the music of Gargle and Yawning (which is the solo project of The Gargle guitar-player Jun. Also released on Fluttery Records – a album called NOAH).

Jun Minowa:Thank you so much, I’m really glad to hear you say so. Not so many at the moment, but thankfully we’ve got some good feedback. Their feedbacks always encourage us.

Jan Hammer: I know that you have collaborate with many other artists, like draff krimmy, Void`s Anatomy and Bosques de mi mente. Is it important for you to stay in contact with other artists? Why do you choose to be so involved in other peoples music?

Jun Minowa: Collaborating with good artists like you (draff krimmy) and Void’s Anatomy were exciting and precious experience for me. I’m always grateful for them. And as someone said, “music is a bridge”, it is meaningful. Since I’ve started Gargle and Yawning, I fortunately could have a lot of opportunities to contact with people around the globe. Because few people are interested in our music here in Japan, they have been my good motivation. I am planning to complete the song with Bosques de mi Mente and include it on our next release.

Jan Hammer: How does it feel like to be part of the Fluttery Records family?

– It’s my great pleasure to be a part of the family. It’s a great independent label and there are a lot of great artists.

Jan Hammer: What are your plans for the future? Are there any tourplans in the near future? Maybe Europe?

Jun Minowa:Though we know it’s not easy and haven’t set a definite schedule, we would like to go on a tour before too long. I’m not sure where it will be, but I’d like to go wherever possible as long as there are people who might be interested in our music. Besides tour, I’d like to make new records of Gargle and Yawning.

Jan Hammer: Thank you for answering my questions and for making such beautiful music.

Jun Minowa: Thank you, Jan. I’m expecting draff krimmy’s new album someday.

Listen & Buy latest Gargle album : Glow in the Gloom

Listen & Buy latest Draff Krimmy album : Poetry of Vår

Listen & Buy latest Yawning EP : Noah

22 Feb 2012

Italian ambient / electro-acousitic project, Music For No Movies releases the debut album

Ambient Electro acoustic project Music For No Movies

Federico Fantuz is an Italian modern music composer, who has just released his debut album on Fluttery Records. Music For No Movies is Fantuz’s electro-acoustic / ambient tunes where he creates a warm cinematic atmosphere by his guitar strings and ambient pads.

Violent Zen is his 11 piece debut. As a music journalist points out “Not only does Music For No Movies turn the very idea of sountrack inside-out – it also succeeds in creating experimental yet intriguing and deeply fascinating soundscapes. Very well done indeed.”

Fluttery Records defines the album like this: “Music For No Movies is a reverse project composed of “orphan” tracks and conceived as soundtracks in search of their cinematic motherhood.The different tracks aim at ecstatic, evocative and dilated atmospheres. More precisely they are cozy and rarefied melodies, distant and unsettling sounds, odd times and grotesque echoes. The core of all the arrangements is the search of an intensity and a sense of suspension that resembles somehow the suspended feeling one has watching a movie.”

The album is recommended if you like Brian Eno, Ralph Towner, Dead Can Dance, Steve Tibbetts, Arvo Pärt , Ennio Morricone, Ry Cooder, Sigur Rós, Yann Tiersen, Labradford, Mark Templeton, North Sea, Xela.

Debut Album of Music For No Movies

The album has already received very good reviews. Here are some of them:

ROLLING STONE:
“Waterquake” is an exhilarating and haunting track suitable for a great dramatic picture whereas the opener “Air Games” operates in the area of a crepuscular and gently melancholy. Other outstanding songs are the irresistible “Earth Job”, adorned with unconventional sounds like chair creaks and coins falls, perfect for a mystery picture, “Wind Wash”, particularly fitting for a positive final sequence in a sad drama that ends full of hope, and “Fire and Sky”, that only asks to be used in an historical movie, maybe in the Spain of the eighteenth century. The intriguing and obsessive “Arvo Moon” is instead suitable for a sequence in which is described the passage of time: in general the instruments’ assemblage is excellent and the arrangement very smooth in order to create a music in which you can pleasantly lose yourself.”

MUSIC REVIEWS:
“The summer is on its way, and with it comes some of the worst movies of the year. Therefore, if you enjoy high quality movies, the summer may not be the best time for you to venture out to the theater. However, with Violent Zen, you can make up your own movies, right there in your mind. The acting will be superb, while the ending will be satisfying because it’s your film. Just imagine the possibilities.”

The album is available on major music download stores like Itunes, Bandcamp, AmazonMP3. The album can be steamed and purchased on the Fluttery Records website.

Listen or Buy This Album

20 Feb 2012

Ambient Artist Diamond Gloss Releases His Debut Album On Fluttery Records

Diamond Gloss incorporates elements of modern classical, electronica, idm, ambient, and post-rock music with live instrumentation

ambient-post-rock

Multi-instrumentalist Gonçalo Pereira, under the alias Diamond Gloss is a young ambient artist from Lisbon who has just released his album on Fluttery Records. The debut album is called Bears. The album is getting good reviews.

On a review on Central Michigan Life, the album is mentioned with these sentences: “It’s hard to describe through words alone how this transition is accomplished but this sound is strong and striking when experienced. Songs like “Walnut and Trees Tables” invoke the thought of taking a nap in a kindergarten music room as an autumn evening breeze chills the air outside; it’s peaceful, serene, and calming. Regardless of what type of music fan a person is, when “Bears” stands on its own it is a beautifully crafted escape through a trail that post-rock and ambient IDM do not normally travel down. With its innocent and emotional pull, it is an easy recommendation, even if this may not be your musical cup of tea.”

Swedish music website Slave State reviews this album too. “Bears is a journey into a dream world you are allowed to visit– at least, with musical help – with repetitive chunks of dark drones, unique mixes by Pereira, mediocre noise music with backwards samples which are far beyond being ordinary with the nice glockenspiels. All in all, “Bears” about everything I need for the next few months. But are you able to sit still with wide open minds for a good hour? I dare to promise to “Bears” will reward you richly!”

His influences travels among modern composers such as Arvo Pärt and Henryk Górecki, the ambient experiments of Brian Eno or his peers Autechre, Hammock, Sigur Rós, Helios and Múm. Pianos, micro-beats, effects-treated guitars, music-boxes, lo-fi strings arrangements and other acoustic instruments such as glockenspiels are the vehicles that shape this carefully produced and layered, non-linear quest. His sound and melodies incorporate elements of modern classical, electronica, idm, ambient, and post-rock music with live instrumentation.
ambient-album-bears

The album is available on Fluttery Records, the label entitles itself as “New home of Post-rockAmbientExperimentalElectronicModern Classical music”. Diamond Gloss’ Bears is also available on major download stores like iTunes, Napster, AmazonMP3 and eMusic.

Listen free or Buy